International Woman’s Day March 8

8 March International Woman’s Day

A day to remember the achievements of woman with a gift of flowers.

International Women’s Day (IWD) is marked on 8 March every year. It is a major day of global celebration for the economic, political and social achievements of women.

Started as a political event, the holiday blended in the culture of many countries (primarily Russia and the countries of former Soviet bloc). In some celebrations, the day lost its political flavour, and became simply an occasion for men to express their sympathy and love to the women around them – somewhat similar to Western Mother’s Day and St Valentine’s Day mixed together. In others, however, the political and human rights theme as designated by the United Nations runs strong, and political and social awareness of the struggles of women worldwide are brought out and examined in a hopeful manner.

The IWD is also celebrated as the first spring holiday, as in the listed countries the first day of March is considered the first day of the spring season.

Poland

MIĘDZYNARODOWY DZIEŃ KOBIET

Latvia

SVEICIENS STARPTAUTISKAJĀ SIEVIEŠU DIENĀ !

Croatia

SRETAN DAN ZENA

Slovakia

MEDZINAROD NY DEN ZIEN

Hungary

NEMZETKO ZI NO NAP

Lituania

SUKOVO 8

Russia

C MEЖДЫУHAPOДHЫM ЖEHCKЫM ДHEM

Romania

ZIUA INTERNATIONALA A FEMEII

International Woman’s Day

International Women’s Day is marked on March the 8th every year.

It is a major day of global celebration for the economic, political and social achievements of women.

Order flowers from Lamber de Bie Flowers in their flowershops or online at http://www.lamberdebie.ie

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The Story of St. Valentine

The Story of St. Valentine

By Lamber de Bie Dutch Master Florist

Every February the fourteenth, chocolate, flowers, and gifts are exchanged between loved ones across the world, all in the name of St. Valentine.

But who is this mysterious saint and why do we celebrate this day.

The history of Valentine’s Day — and its patron saint — is shrouded in mystery. But we do know that February has long been a month of romance. St. Valentine’s Day, as we know it today, contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition. So, who was Saint Valentine and how did he become associated with this ancient rite? Today, the Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all of whom were martyred.

One legend contends that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. When Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men — his crop of potential soldiers. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death.

Other stories suggest that Valentine may have been killed for attempting to help Christians escape harsh Roman prisons where they were often beaten and tortured.

According to one legend, Valentine actually sent the first ‘valentine’ greeting himself. While in prison, it is believed that Valentine fell in love with a young girl  “who may have been his jailor’s daughter” who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, it is alleged that he wrote her a letter, which he signed ‘From your Valentine,’ an expression that is still in use today. Although the truth behind the Valentine legends is murky, the stories certainly emphasize his appeal as a sympathetic, heroic, and, most importantly, romantic figure. It’s no surprise that by the Middle Ages, Valentine was one of the most popular saints in England and France.

In Great Britain, Valentine’s Day began to be popularly celebrated around the seventeenth century. By the middle of the eighteenth century, it was common for friends and lovers in all social classes to exchange small tokens of affection or handwritten notes. By the end of the century, printed cards began to replace written letters due to improvements in printing technology. Ready-made cards were an easy way for people to express their emotions in a time when direct expression of one’s feelings was discouraged.

According to the American Greeting Card Association, an estimated one billion valentine cards are sent each year in the USA alone, making Valentine’s Day the second largest card-sending day of the year after Christmas.

In addition to the Ireland and the U. K. Valentine’s Day is celebrated very big in the United States, Canada, Mexico, France, and Australia. Countries like Holland and Germany are only in the last few years getting into sending Valentines greetings. And still in very small numbers at that.

Valentine greetings were popular as far back as the Middle Ages (written Valentine’s cards didn’t begin to appear until after 1400), and the oldest known Valentine card is on display at the British Museum.

However the largest percentage of all valentine greetings are still sent by women, Irish men are getting more romantic. Valentines day is the one day that we will see at least as many men in our flower shops as we see woman buying flowers.

Lamber de Bie

Dutch Master Florist