New E-Commerce Web-Site Live Today.

New E-Commerce Web-Site Live Today.

www.LamberdeBie.ie

Our new e-commerce site is live.

Lamber de Bie Flowers is launching their new e-commerce website today to the World Wide Web.

From our website you are able to order flowers for delivery anywhere in Ireland, Northern Ireland and anywhere in the UK for next day delivery.

For delivery to anywhere else please contact us and we will be delighted to look after your needs.

After lots of preparations we are proud to introduce you to our new 24/7 online store. At www.lamberdebie.ie you will be able to shop from a large, and ever growing selection of flowers, bouquets and arrangements for every occasion.

We promise all our online customers the same attention to detail as well as the same approach of 100% satisfaction guaranteed for all our customers as well as for those lucky recipients of our flowers as we have been doing over the past 10 years in our 3 retail stores in Waterford as well as in Kilkenny.

Approx. one year ago I followed a number of courses in web design, not with the intention of creating our own but to make sure we would find the right partners in creating our new online flower web site.

12 Years ago we launched out first web-site and have learned trough trail and error, some times they were expensive lessons and other times, often with the help of friends we improved our than web presence.

This time, wanting to create e modern E-commerce site, we chose to work with a Waterford based company called Smartweb to whom I was introduced by Gavin Dixon. We have been using Gavin’s Company “BITS”(Business IT Solutions) for many years.

I met first with Eugene Silov, from Smartweb early this spring. The first number of meetings were about the layout and content required and that meant that I spent hours and days looking at websites from florists and other online product sellers. There was a lot of R&D (Rob & Duplicate) as well as finding solutions on how to implement our own ideas.

Our website is developed so that I control the input all products, descriptions and price as well as most other content. This was, and will be very time consuming but will be the only way I can guarantee that the site will be up to date always.

As our web site is now live our next step is to create a suitable google-adwords campaign in order to drive more traffic to our site as well as discussing further plans with Eugene for our site as I believe any store needs to be updated to keep it fresh.

We are 10 years in retail at the end of this month and I know that this is only possible trough constant improvement on the stores, services and products, this same approach we will use towards our online sales of flowers.

On our new site you will also find a selection of photos of wedding flowers we are creating. These will be continuously updated.

If anyone needs help with the development of an online store I would be more than happy to recommend Eugene from Smartweb. I look forward to working with both Bits & Smartweb in the future to constantly improve our service.

We sincerely look forward to any comments on how we can make the experience of shopping at our online store better.

Send us your comments to info@lamberdebie.com .

Web Design Smartweb Waterford Ireland

Premier IT Support Solutions – BITS South East Ireland

Lamber de Bie.

Dutch Master Florist

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ARE FLOWERS AND PLANTS A WASTE OF MONEY?

ARE FLOWERS AND PLANTS A WASTE OF MONEY?
Are flowers and plants a waste of money?
ArticleReader Comments By Rhys Timson
Sep 10, 2010
Flowers in offices are not a waste of money
Another month, another politician citing spending on cut flowers and plants as an example of waste.

This time, it’s communities secretary Eric Pickles, and his target is the Audit Commission, a government body set up to monitor local government spending. Mr Pickles thinks that the organisation’s bill of £40,000 a year for pot plants for its offices makes it a “creature of the Whitehall state” and an example of spendthrift government departments and QUANGOs.

The head of the Audit Commission, Michael O’Higgins, explained that the £40,000 breaks down to £20 a week over the organisation’s 37 offices. This doesn’t actually sound like a lot of money to me, especially when you consider the effect greenery around the office can have on employees. But Mr Pickles, and many of the newspapers, haven’t let the facts get in the way of a good story or, indeed, their political agendas.

If Mr Pickles cared to investigate the subject, he’d find that, time and time again, research has shown that flowers and plants in offices have a positive effect on employees that’s well worth the money spent on them.

Forexample, workplace absenteeism costs the UK £16.8bn a year and research by Plants for People has shown plants in offices can cut that absenteeism by a quarter.

Further, research by growers’ union Air So Pure has confirmed that plants purify the air, reducing the levels of toxins which can cause sickness and ill-health in offices.

So, if the government really wants to save money, it would be well advised not to make a scapegoat of spending on pot plants or cut flowers. They are not a luxury. They are not a waste. They are vital component of any productive, healthy office. They clean the air, they brighten the place up and they improve the mood of employees.

In all, cut flowers and pot plants in offices will save the government money over the long term. But the long term never looks so good in the headlines does it?

A Taste of Christmas – A wonderful night.

The night started off with a performance of  the Newtown school music group.

First up: Kevin Dundon, Celebrity Chef.

Cooking up a storm.

Tanya, Mashy, Lamber, Margaret.

And then it was time that Lamber gave all his work away.

And here are some of the lucky winners.

Lamber de Bie – Dutch Master Florist at the Taste of Christmas in Ardkeen Quality Foodstore, 3rd December 2009.

A great Night.

Phalaenopsis Orchid

Phalaenopsis Orchids

The Orchid plant, and especially the Phalaenopsis orchid has become the no 1 bestselling houseplant over the past few years. This is no surprise considering the ease of care, their incrediblle beauty and their long life as a houseplant when looked after correctly.

In order to find out how to look after these wonderful flowering house plants, let’s find out some more about the Phalaenopsis Orchid.

Phalaenopsis Orchids, as any other orchid, are epiphytes.

Epiphytes are plant that grows upon or are attached to another plant or object merely for physical support. Epiphytes are found mostly in the tropics and are also known as air plants because they have no attachment to the ground or other obvious nutrient source. They obtain water and minerals from rain and from debris on the supporting plants. Orchids, ferns, and members of the pineapple family are common tropical epiphytes. Lichens, mosses, liverworts, and algae are epiphytes of temperate regions.

Knowing how they grow in their origional habitat will explain us a lot about how we should care for these plants in the home. For those that had a closer look at the soil that your potted Phalaenopsis orchid is planted in will have noticed that it contains of a very loose structure of mostly small pieces of bark. Knowing orchids grow on trees in their natural habitat, were water flows away immediately after rainfall, explains us that we may never have any remaining water in our container after watering our orchid. Over watering is one of the most common causes of orchid plants not surviving in the home.

Always place your Phalaenopsis orchid in a place in your home were you have a relative constant temperature(e.g. sitting room), away from drafts and direct sunlight. Water very moderately and feed once every two weeks when in flower or bud and once every four to six weeks when flowers are finished. Always use special orchid feed, and never more than is indicated on the bottle. Personally I give my orchids half the amount as is written on the bottle to avoid burning the roots.

Your orchid plant can easily flower up to six months at a time. When finished flowering cut the flower stems down to one inch above the second “knot” from the base. This is where your new flower will appear after some patience. Also reduce the water and food you give your plant for approx four months to give the plant a rest period. Leave the plant in the same position and sort of forget about it for a while. When your new flower buds appear you can slightly increase your feeding.

Orchidaceae are cosmopolitan, occurring in almost every habitat apart from deserts and glaciers. The great majority are to be found in the tropics, mostly Asia, South America and Central America, but they are also found above the Arctic Circle, in southern Patagonia and even on Macquarie Island, close to Antarctica.

It is no wonder that it was in Asia, Tokyo to be specific, where I saw the most impressive selection of Phalaenopsis Orchids for sale. After all tropical Asia is home to most known varieties of Orchids (approx: 300 families), followed by tropical America and tropical Africa who are both home to approx: 250 families of Orchids.

In this Tokyo, Orchid Shop, they never watered the plants, however they mist the leaves and the heart of the plant twice daily with pure spring water.

Apart from their wonderful qualities as a stylish, elegant houseplant in our modern homes the Phalaenopsis orchid is becoming increasingly popular as a cut flower mainly used for wedding bouquets and elegant table centre pieces.

In the bouquet above I used the white Phalaenopsis orchid in combination with creme Avalanche roses and pure white Lily of the Valley. A perfectly elegant winter white wedding bouquet.

In this table centre piece I used the smaller lilac Phalaenopsis Orchid as a support to the lilac and peach roses.

This cascading wedding bouquet combines the bright pink “Aqua” Roses with the “Hot Lip” Phalaenopsis Orchid.

This soft and elegant bridal bouquet with a selection of creme and peach roses, Lily of the Valley and soft ferns contributed to a wonderful day for Maria on her wedding day.

I hope that I have helped to grow your enthuasiasm for this wonderful family in the plant world.

For any of you who would like to know more about all varieties of Orchids, were they come from, how to grow them, build up an impressive collection and much more there is a book I bought almost ten years ago and can highly reccommend: Orchids – A Practical Handbook by Brian & Wilma Rittershausen ISBN 1-84309-209-3

Lamber de Bie

Dutch Master Florist

http://www.lamberdebie.com